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Topic Photography Forum | Photgraphy passes

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Hi, do you need a pass to take photos and films at all airports or is it just some? I am new to plane spotting and have only done it twice. If you could tell me it would be a great help.
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In the UK you can take photos at any airport as long as you aren't inside the terminal or on private land (with the exception of military airfields)
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My impression is that you more welcomed at UK military airfields than many of the civilian airports - low and no fences and some of them have even their own viewing areas.

Posted Photo

Taking photos inside terminals isn't generally forbidden but the security areas are no photo zones.
And this private land rule is for England only.
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Quote Quoting LN-KGL, from a previous post

Taking photos inside terminals isn't generally forbidden

I think you'll find that taking photos anywhere inside UK airport terminals IS generally forbidden (unless you have a permit), BUT, in practice, most airport staff will turn a blind-eye unless you do something to draw attention to yourself.
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Baltimore, then you have to show me where this is written. In some areas you can find a photo forbidden sign, but below it you will also see in clear text how restricted the photo ban is. Of course you have to follow these signs the same way as you follow the signs for "Smoking not allowed inside the terminal building - except for the outdoor smoking area which is accessed from the food court and is clearly signposted".
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Quote Quoting LN-KGL, from a previous post

Baltimore, then you have to show me where this is written. In some areas you can find a photo forbidden sign, but below it you will also see in clear text how restricted the photo ban is. Of course you have to follow these signs the same way as you follow the signs for "Smoking not allowed inside the terminal building - except for the outdoor smoking area which is accessed from the food court and is clearly signposted".


As far as I'm aware, inside a terminal building is private property and you need permission from the owner to photograph inside that building. There are no laws etc against it, but without prior consent it's generally forbidden.
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This post was edited on Thursday 16th August, 2012 at 09:26 GMT
Quote Quoting LN-KGL, from a previous post

Baltimore, then you have to show me where this is written.

The BAA website (which covers Aberdeen, Glasgow, Heathrow, Stansted and Southampton Airports) states that: "To do any kind of filming or photography at one of our airports you will need a special permit." The Gatwick Airport website states that: "All filming and photography requests are considered on a case by case basis and require an official permit." There are other examples that I could quote, but I think you probably get my gist.
Quote Quoting Sam-at-MAN, from a previous post

There are no laws etc against it

Section 63 and Schedule 3, Airports Act 1986 enable airport operators to make their own byelaws and it these powers that are normally used to restrict or prohibit filming and/or photography.

Believe it or not, 'civil aviation property' is also designated as a "prohibited place" under Section 3 of the Official Secrets Act, where "it is illegal to collect, record, publish, or communicate to any other person photographs or information which is calculated to be or might be or is intended to be directly or indirectly useful to an enemy."

Under Section 58a (more commonly known as Section 76) of the Terrorism Act 2000, it is an offence "to collect or possesses information of a kind likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism or to possess a document or record containing information of that kind." The normal burden of proof is also reversed, so that the accused must prove that they had a reasonable excuse for having the information (which, the Act states, specifically includes photographs) in their possession. This, therefore, means that taking a photograph of anything that may be of use to a terrorist, such as an airport or aircraft, could, in theory, lead to arrest or at least a stop and search.

However, as I said in my original post, unless you do something to draw attention to yourself, the mere act of taking a photograph in or close to a UK airport will not normally result in a clash with the relevant authorities.
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Thanks for that Baltimore, interesting stuff I never knew!
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Quote Quoting Sam-at-MAN, from a previous post

As far as I'm aware, inside a terminal building is private property and you need permission from the owner to photograph inside that building. There are no laws etc against it, but without prior consent it's generally forbidden.


Does that apply if you are at the window shooting outside? I remember the old cafe at MAN in T1 that was very popular with spotters (when it rained) and nobody ever had problems taking pics from there.

As for permits the only place i can think of is CDG, most european airports are ok with spotters as long as they are behaving themselves
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I think if you're inside taking photos through a window you're generally fine, it's when you start taking pictures of the building layout etc that people will (quite rightly) get twitchy. I often see people in the airport taking family photos etc which I find perfectly acceptable, as travel is part of the holiday, but I also see individuals trying to take photos of immigration, security etc
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Gents,

I can't say much on the civil side of things as that's not my normal subject, but I would agree in general with the comment posted above about military airfields being okay, assuming that we're talking about outside the fence here. It varies depending on the base, as attitudes and policies can be different. In the South East, where I'm located you can go to RAF bases at Coningsby and Wadddington without any real issues. As shown above, Waddington has an official vewing area (The WAVE), where as Coningsby has and unofficial car park at the 07 end, but photography over the fence with stepladders is accepted all round the fenceline (as many of the pics here show) without any problems. The USAF at Lakenheath and Mildenhall are usually okay, and both have several spots from where pictures can be taken. Their security squadron personnel sometimes overstep the mark when talking to people outside the fence, but usually responding with a suggestion to call the civilian police normally gets them to go away. That's exceptional though, and they're pretty good generally. RAF Marham is the airfield that has the reputation for being anti-enthusiast. Although you can access the approach at both ends they really don't like people down by the fence, and they're backed up by the local farmers who also don't like people around the outside of there fields. It is also my experience that security at airfields are far more twitchy about you photographing the infrastructure than any aircraft.

Gary
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Gary is spot on - if you'll excuse the pun! In my experience, Waddington, Coningsby, Lakenheath and Mildenhall are among the best RAF bases to spot/take photos at. The only 'slight' problem with Waddington is that you can sometimes spend all day at the WAVE and only see half a dozen or so aircraft movements. That said, you can always take refuge in the Sentry Post Snack Bar, where the good folk behind the counter will happily keep you topped up with tea, coffee, bacon rolls, etc.
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Could the airport owners be botherd more about data protection on photograpy inside the airport buildings?
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The takeing of photographs in public places is becomeing a night mare !
In the UK we have more CCTs filming our every move than any country in europe. yet you need a licence to take a picture in a public place. To me this sounds crazy..
The idea is to make the public areas safer but it actually has the opposite affect.
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I got approached by MOD plod at RAF Marham once,told me more or less to "go away",so be warned!
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Thanks guys happy
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